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Many people believe that the assets in their estate will be divided exactly the way their Will instructs. However, probate laws in your state or where your Will is being probated may treat some of your property differently. Estate property is categorized as either probate property or non-probate property. In this article, we will explore the difference between probate property and non-probate property, and how to avoid your property going through the probate process.  
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If you’re close to reaching retirement, there are many things to be excited about— more time to spend on your passions and with the people you love. However, dreams of retirement are often followed closely by concerns about whether you are prepared for this next chapter in your life. From finances to health care to estate planning, planning for retirement is no simple task. Here are some questions to consider:   Should you have long-term
If you are purchasing a home in Myrtle Beach SC, congratulations! While the difficult part of the process should hopefully be over, here’s a list of things you should know as you get ready for your closing.   You won’t get your keys until the deed is recorded. In Horry County, where Myrtle Beach is located, you typically do not get the keys until the Deed is recorded. This can be later on the same
If you’re putting thought into the best estate planning solution for your assets, you may have considered forming a Trust for your children and/or grandchildren. A Trust can be a great option to protect your intentions for your estate, while providing for your family. However, a Trust is not always the best solution for every estate plan. Consider the following pros and cons of setting up a Trust for your heirs:   PROS Trusts are

When a “Will” is Not a Will

Posted by grandstrandlaw on April 10, 2018
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Category: Uncategorized
Most people think of a “Will” simply as a document that expresses their wishes of who should inherit their property after they pass. However, every state, including South Carolina, has specific statutory laws that impose certain requirements in order for a Will to be valid and enforceable. If a Will is not validly executed, then it will not be enforceable. If an individual does not have an enforceable Will, their property will be passed on
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